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20121129
20121207
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is the federal government spending under control. we continue to get closer to this incredible fiscal cliff and i think that the president should take a case study analysis and look at what president coolidge did and jfk, john f. kennedy when they went in and lowered tax rates and increased revenues, which is exactly what we're talking about. >> so either you've got a president who is tremendously overconfident after being reelected or someone who asks for the sty in the first offer knowing that he will look like the compromising once he gives in on the demands and gets himself involved in negotiations. >> both sides are waiting to see who is going to offer up the plan first, we're waiting on the white house. >> it's the president's job, isn't it? congress controls the purse strings and the white house is waiting for-- we're waiting for something from congress on their side and go back and forth, who puts up the offer first and it's the first salvo, so, michigan mcconnell laughs at it and timothy geithner hands it to them. this isn't real. >> i didn't know that first was the first offer. we have
in the deadlocked talks to avert the so-called fiscal cliff, the devastating combinations of tax increase and spending cuts that kick in january 1st. both sides seem to dig in this morning on the sunday talk shows. >> the only thing standing in the way of that would be a refusal by republicans that the rates would have to go up on the wealthiest americans, and i don't really see them doing it. >> right now, i would say we're nowhere, period, we're nowhere. >> that somber assessment today from house speaker john boehner, as geithner, the point man, went on all five sunday talk shows, cnbc, washington correspondent aman javers joining me live now. did geithner offer anything new today? >> he really didn't. he thinks the republicans are bluffing here and they are not prepared to go all the way to the mat here on behalf of tax cuts for the rich. they think at the white house they've got their republicans backed into a political corner here, and they are really pressing their advantage hard. you saw this sort of breathtaking offer by the president of the united states last week when he offered
is assuming unprecedented power to spend taxpayer dollars without any limit at all. >> even as the fiscal cliff negotiations drag on in washington, wall street seems to be basically unphased. the dow jones has slipped only about 200 points since the election. why isn't wall street more on edge itself? william cohen is the author of "money and power, hold goldman sachs came to rule the world." the labor department came out with the applications for unemployment aid saying it fell sharply for the last week and stocks basically opened flat this morning as we've seen. some of that has to do more with europe than it does with washington. but what is your reasoning for why wall street hasn't displayed more of an impact from this fiscal cliff nonsense? >> thomas, what wall street hates most of all is uncertainty and it's counterintuitive, there's actually plenty of certainty now. what's going to be certain is taxes are going up. either we go off the cliff or the curb and then taxes rise for everybody and then maybe they get repealed for the middle class and others or we reach a deal and taxes go
Search Results 0 to 3 of about 4 (some duplicates have been removed)